Let the Past Die: The Mariners Should Sign Carlos Correa

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS - OCTOBER 05: Carlos Correa #4 of the Minnesota Twins looks on against the Chicago White Sox at Guaranteed Rate Field on October 05, 2022 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS - OCTOBER 05: Carlos Correa #4 of the Minnesota Twins looks on against the Chicago White Sox at Guaranteed Rate Field on October 05, 2022 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images) /
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HOUSTON, TX – NOVEMBER 03: Carlos Correa #1 of the Houston Astros holds the World Series Trophy during the Houston Astros Victory Parade on November 3, 2017 in Houston, Texas. The Astros defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-1 in Game 7 to win the 2017 World Series. (Photo by Tim Warner/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX – NOVEMBER 03: Carlos Correa #1 of the Houston Astros holds the World Series Trophy during the Houston Astros Victory Parade on November 3, 2017 in Houston, Texas. The Astros defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers 5-1 in Game 7 to win the 2017 World Series. (Photo by Tim Warner/Getty Images) /

Seattle fits what Carlos Correa wants

As I know most of you hate the idea of adding a former Astro to the Mariners, I ask that you take a look at it from Carlos Correa’s perspective. After the 2021 season, one in which Correa was arguably the best player on their team that nearly won a championship, he was shunned by the Astros in free agency. It was shocking to see a franchise that drafted him number one overall, raised him, won with him, protected him from the cheating scandal, and won with him again, would then let him walk without much of a fight.

This turn by Houston absolutely had an effect on Correa’s free agency and played a role in him signing a three-year deal with a one-year out with the Twins, rather than the mega contract he was likely looking for. After a great individual season that saw very little team success in Minnesota, Correa was a guest studio analyst for TBS and had the awkward duty of interviewing new Houston Astros shortstop and future World Series MVP Jeremy Pena right after Pena’s 18th-inning blast eliminated the Mariners in the ALDS.

You can’t tell me that didn’t hurt for Correa. It probably hurt more to watch Houston be vindicated for their decision, as they won their second title* in six years. Not only did they win, but there was a lot of noise about how the team was better off without him.

Correa has to want to prove them wrong, and there’s no better place to prove that than here in Seattle. Would there need to be a smoothing over between past transgressions and the booing he has received in Seattle? Absolutely, but as I mentioned in my 2023 offseason plan, the majority of those previous Mariners are gone, and a few more may be out the door by Christmas.

This is the dawn of a new era in Seattle, with new stars, new leaders, and much higher expectations. If Correa is willing to play in Minnesota, then he’s willing to play anywhere! Seattle is a rising power that needs one more star to truly make Houston feel uncomfortable.

He may have been an enemy of the Mariners, but now he appears to be enemies with the Astros. The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

It is time to let the past die Seattle, and bring Carlos Correa to Seattle on a 10-year deal for $330 Million.

Next. Julio Rodriguez signs massive extension with the Mariners. dark

There may be no better team-up or story this season than the Mariners and Correa joining forces to take down the most hated team in baseball.

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