The Drought, Part I: The 10 Worst Mariners Since 2001

SEATTLE, WA - APRIL 15: A general view of Safeco Field as Felix Hernandez
SEATTLE, WA - APRIL 15: A general view of Safeco Field as Felix Hernandez /
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#8: 1B/3B Scott Spiezio

SEATTLE – JULY 15: Scott Spiezio #23 of the Seattle Mariners fields the ball during the game against the Cleveland Indians on July 15, 2004 at Safeco Field in Seattle, Washington. The Mariners defeated the Indians 2-1. (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
SEATTLE – JULY 15: Scott Spiezio #23 of the Seattle Mariners fields the ball during the game against the Cleveland Indians on July 15, 2004 at Safeco Field in Seattle, Washington. The Mariners defeated the Indians 2-1. (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images) /

Another Angel-turned-Mariner. The M’s hoped Spiezio would bring something they desperately needed: veteran leadership and playoff experience. Spiezio was one of the heroes for the Angels in their World Series victory in 2002, which was a breakout year for him.

When Spiezio signed with the Mariners in 2004, he was coming off three straight years worth roughly two wins each. He wasn’t an offensive juggernaut, but he got on base often and had the ability to put one in the stands every now and then.

Instead, Spiezio only played in 112 games and looked absolutely lost at the plate all season. His OBP dropped 38 points from his 2003 numbers, and he ultimately posted an awful slash line of .215/.288/.346.

Spiezio somehow found himself on the 2005 Mariners as well, but only lasted 29 games. Things got even worse for Spiezio that year, hitting for a -26 wRC+. The M’s had enough and cut ties with Spiezio.

Of course, Spiezio went to the Cardinals and suddenly became good again. Spiezio posted career highs in wRC+ (123) and wOBA (.370) while becoming a World Series champion with St. Louis in 2006.

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